An International Research Journal

Vol 25, No 4 & 5, April-May, 2016

AJP

SSN : 0971 - 3093

Vol 25, No 4 & 5, April-May, 2016

25th Anniversary Year of AJP-2016


Asian Journal of Physics                                                                                                  Vol. 25 No 4 & 5 (2016) 00-00


Recent advances in fringe-adjusted joint transform correlation based optical pattern recognition techniques


Paheding Sidike1, Vijayan K Asari1 and Mohammad S Alam2

1Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469 USA

2Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 36688 USA

 

In real-time Optical Pattern Recognition (OPR), Fringe-adjusted Joint Transform Correlation (FJTC) has shown very promising performance compared to alternate JTCs. This paper provides a systematic review of the recent advances in the FJTC based OPR algorithms, including the classical FJTC, Phase-encoded FJTC (PFJTC), Shifted Phased-encoded FJTC (SPFJTC), and Logarithmic FJTC (LFJTC). We also evaluate their performance on the face recognition using three standard face recognition databases, namely the Yale face database, the extended Yale-Bdatabase and CMU-AMPdatabase. Test results show that the LFJTC provides superior performance compared to the state-of-the-art FJTC based OPR methods.

Key words: Optical Pattern Recognition (OPR), Fringe-adjusted Joint Transform Correlation (FJTC), Phase-encoded FJTC (PFJTC), Shifted Phased-encoded FJTC (SPFJTC), Logarithmic FJTC (LFJTC). © Anita Publications. All rights reserved.

Total Refs: 29

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Asian Journal of Physics                                                                                               Vol. 25 No 4 & 5 (2016) 00-00


Visualization and quantification of light sources spectra with a simple cell phone based spectroscopic system


Rocío Espinosa-Gutierrez1, Ignacio Moreno1,*, Pascuala Garcia-Martinez2, Jenaro Guisasola3 and Jesús Carnicer4

1 Department of Materials Science, Optics and Electronics Technology, University Miguel Hernandez, 03202, Elche, Spain.

2 Department of Optics, University of Valencia, 45100, Burjassot, Spain.

3 Department of Applied Physics, University of Basque Country, 20014, San Sebastian, Spain.

4 Pedagogical Department, MUDIC-VBS-CV, 03300, Orihuela (Alicante), Spain.

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In this paper, we present the implementation of a simple and low cost optical spectroscopic system based on the use of a common cell phone camera. It is shown how it can be useful for developing both qualitative spectra visualizations, to but also quantitative measurements. Therefore, it can be useful for application in demonstrations in science museums, as well as for introductory courses of Physics. In addition, it is also useful  to measure wavelengths in a very simple manner.We show results with different gas-discharge lamps, lasers, LEDs or filament bulbs. © Anita Publications. All rights reserved.

Total Refs: 19 

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Asian Journal of Physics                                                                                              Vol. 25 No 4 & 5 (2016) 501-510


Resolution enhancement in digital holographic microscopy and tomography system


Balasubramani Vinoth, Yu-Chih Lin, Xin-Ji Lai, and Chau-Jern Cheng*
Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology,
National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan

Dedicated to Prof FTS Yu

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In digital holographic microscopy (DHM) achieving phase sensitivity is signifcant, which plays a major role in deciding the accuracy of the system. Our study elucidates the achievement of axial sub-nanometer precision with improvement in net phase sensitivity by instantaneous use of phase reference and temporal averaging techniques in DHM. To enhance the spatial resolution we implemented a synthetic aperture (SA) DHM system. The use of spectrum normalization method in SA-DHM system has helped to increase the spatial resolution and the phase sensitivity of the system. We also demonstrated the 3D imaging method based on sectional imaging technique to measure the refractive index variation between the spliced end of single mode fber and the polarization maintaining fber with digital holographic microscopy and tomography system (DHMT).© Anita Publications. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Digital holographic microscopy (DHM), Spatial resolution, Phase sensitivity, Tomography system.

Resolution enhancement in digital holographic microscopy and tomography system.pdf
Balasubramani Vinoth, Yu-Chih Lin, Xin-Ji Lai, and Chau-Jern Cheng

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Asian Journal of Physics                                                                                        Vol. 25 No 4 & 5 (2016) 609-630


Latest advances in single and multiwavelength digital holography and holographic microscopy

 

George Nehmetallah1, Logan Williams2, Thanh Nguyen1, Han Li3, and Scott Mathews1

1Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Catholic Univ. of America, Washington DC 20064, USA

2Logan Williams, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433.

3Han Li, EOP Program, University of Dayton, Dayton OH 45469

Dedicated to Prof FTS Yu

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In this work, we discuss the latest advances in digital holography (DH) and digital holographic microscopy (DHM). Specifically, we study the different setup configurations such as single and multiwavelength approaches in reflection and transmission modes and the reconstruction algorithms used. We also propose two novel telecentric recording configurations for single and multi-wavelength digital holographic microscopy (TMW -DHM) systems. Brief theory and results are shown for each of the experimental setups discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of the different configurations will be studied in details. Typical configuration features are, ease of phase reconstruction, speed, vertical measurement range without phase ambiguity, difficulty in applying optical and numerical post-processing aberration compensation methods. Aberrations can be due to: (a) misalignment, (b) multiwavelength method resulting in Chromatic aberrations, (c) the MO resulting in parabolic phase curvature, (d) the angle of the reference beam resulting in linear phase distortions, and (e) different optical components used in the setup, such as spherical aberration, astigmatism, coma, and distortion. We conclude that telecentric configuration eliminates the need of extensive digital automatic aberration compensation or the need for a second hologram’s phase to be used to obtain the object phase map through subtraction. We also conclude that without a telecentric setup and even with post-processing a residual phase remains to perturb the measurement. Finally, a custom developed user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) software is employed to automate the reconstruction processes for all configurations.© Anita Publications. All rights reserved.

Latest advances in single and multiwavelength digital holography and holographic microscopy.pdf
George Nehmetallah, Logan Williams, Thanh Nguyen, Han Li and Scott Mathews

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Asian Journal of Physics                                                                                       Vol. 25 No 4 & 5 (2016) 00-00


Active and tunable near-infrared hyperbolic metamaterials


Joseph Smalley1, Conor T Riley2, Felipe Vallini1 , Donald J Sirbuly2, Zhaowei Liu1,Yeshaiahu Fainman1

1Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UC San Diego
2Department of NanoEngineering, UC San Diego


Dedicated to Prof FTS Yu

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Hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs) are metal-dielectric composite materials that exhibit hyperbolic dispersion for electromagnetic waves. The extreme anisotropy and broadband optical density of states associated with hyperbolic dispersion enable enhanced spontaneous emission rates and nonlinear processes, as well as guiding of light below the diffraction limit. While promising for next-generation nanophotonic devices and circuits, the behavior of passive HMMs are limited by fixed properties and high dissipation rates. Therefore, HMMs with active components for tunable properties and loss-compensation have become a subject of intense research. In this review, we investigate active and tunable HMM in the near-infrared frequency regime. We review HMMs based on indium gallium arsenide phosphide (InGaAsP) multiple quantum wells (MQW), a gain material commonly used in lasers for communication systems, as well as HMMs based on aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO), a transition conducting oxide with synthesis-dependent properties. We also offer an outlook on circuit-level applications of active, near-infrared HMM. © Anita Publications. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Photonics, Metamaterials, Nanophotonic devices, Mulitple quantum wells (MQW)

1 Introduction
Photonics is the scientific and engineering discipline devoted to the generation, transmission, processing, and detection of light. Fueling photonics are fundamental questions rooted in human curiosity along with practical questions rooted in human wants and needs. Photonics combines classical electromagnetism and condensed matter physics, with engineering practices, enabling the global fiber-optic communication system, energy-efficient illumination, and devices for sensing disease and pollution. Increasingly, the interaction of light with materials at the nanoscale has become more accessible and better understood. Nanoscale photonics, or herein simply, nanophotonics, focuses on these interactions, and combines the tools of nanotechnology with the already interdisciplinary scope of photonics.
Moore’s Law  [1] describes the revolutionary process in which the characteristic length scale of transistors was reduced from over 10 μm to 5 nm, between the 1960s and today, resulting in the reduction of per-transistor price from 5 dollars to less than one billionth of one dollar  [2]. Guided by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, the information processing and storage capacity of human civilization has increased exponentially  [2,3]. Photonics undoubtedly helped enable the electronics revolution through photo-lithography machines with ever increasing resolution. However, because the ultimate speed limit of photons far exceeds that of electrons, there has also been a steady trend to reduce the characteristic length scale of photonic devices themselves  [4]. Traditionally, the dimensions of optical components, such as cavities and waveguides, have been limited to the order of the wavelength of operation. Nanophotonic devices have emerged, however, with sizes below the diffraction limit of light.

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Corresponding author :
e-mail:fainman@eng.ucsd.edu (Yeshaiahu Fainman)

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